Category:Märklin catalogues

From The Brighton Toy and Model Index
~1906: Colour-coded cover specifically for the gauge 0 version of the model railway catalogue, "Schienenanlagen für Eisenbahnen"

~1906: Colour-coded cover specifically for the gauge 0 version of the model railway catalogue, "Schienenanlagen für Eisenbahnen" [image info]

~1925: The Märklin Clockwork Railway Handbook, photocopy

~1925: The Märklin Clockwork Railway Handbook, photocopy [image info]

1931: Catalogue front cover artwork, by Josef Danilowatz

1931: Catalogue front cover artwork, by Josef Danilowatz [image info]

1932: Catalogue front cover artwork, by Josef Danilowatz

1932: Catalogue front cover artwork, by Josef Danilowatz [image info]

1937: Cover of "Märklin Miniature Electric Table Railways" English-market catalogue

1937: Cover of "Märklin Miniature Electric Table Railways" English-market catalogue [image info]

1939: Märklin Catalogue front cover

1939: Märklin Catalogue front cover [image info]

2002 Märklin Catalogue cover

2002 Märklin Catalogue cover [image info]

Märklin catalogue images

Märklin's early, basic catalogues from 1895 onwards had minimal text, with engraved pictures of items identified by number, and cover and introductory text in German, French and English – a common approach during this period with other manufacturers (such as Richter), as it allowed a single catalogue to be used across three language regions.

In the 1900s there were different catalogues (with colour coding) for the different railway gauges, and in the UK during the early 1920s there were different catalogues for clockwork, electric and steam model railways.

The "native" full Marklin catalogues started being produced with full colour covers from the early 1920s onwards, and were translated into other languages, with a mix of monochrome and colour interior illustrations appearing in 1929, to catch up with the colour catalogues and Hornby Book of Trains produced by Meccano Ltd in Britain from the late 1920s through the 1930s – Meccano Ltd having struck on the ingenious method of subsidising their colour catalogues by turning them into "annuals" with technical articles on monochrome pages, and colour printing reserved for the catalogue pages. All pages for the Märklin are supposed to have moved over to full colour in 1935.

Josef Danilowatz, artist

Josef Danilowatz (1877 - 1945 ) was an Austrian painter and draftsman who created cover artwork for a series of classic Marklin catalogues through the 1930s.

Sizes

Although the later catalogues were standard A4 size (297 × 210 mm), the earlier ones tended to be a little oversized, which can present problems for archival storage.

Modern covers

External links

Media in category ‘Märklin catalogues’

The following 25 files are in this category, out of 25 total.