Nishi Geisha Dolls (Japanese Dolls)

From The Brighton Toy and Model Index
== this section may refer to an older museum exhibition that is no longer on display ==
Past Exhibit

Nishi Geisha Dolls (Japanese Dolls)

Dancing Nishi Dolls (Japanese Dolls).jpg (i)
BTMM map 019.gif
location:
Arch Two , Area 19
-

Three separate stands displaying five Nishi (fabric) dolls, dated between the 1950s and 1970s.

Appearance

The first and largest Nishi Geisha can be seen in the foreground of the cabinet on the left, wearing a red kimono and traditional broad-brimmed kasa had while holding an umbrella.

Nishi Geisha Doll


The second stand, behind the first Nishi doll, holds a pair of dancing Nishi dolls, a man and a woman. The man wears a cream and green obi, while the geisha beside him wears a red kimono with blue patterns.

Dancing Nishi Dolls


The final pair of Nishi dolls can be seen at the back of the cabinet, the geisha wears a bright blue kimono, and stands beside a blonde-haired man in a black and cream obi.

Nishi Dolls, man and Western-influenced man

The American influence in these dolls is very clear - the wide eyes, small lips and large foreheads are reminiscent of the classic 'Barbie doll' look, and the fact that a male and female doll are stood together on the same stand (with one of the male dolls being blonde as well!) is a clear imitation of 'Barbie & Ken'.

Purpose

These dolls were, no doubt, manufactured for display purposes. The quality of their silk clothing, the stands on which they are poised, indicates that they were not produced as children's toys.

External links

== this section may refer to an older museum exhibition that is no longer on display ==