Coronation Class locomotive card model (Micromodels Set MII)

From The Brighton Toy and Model Index
= Coronation Scot at Brighton Toy and Model Museum =
This exhibit was on display between November 2012 and early 2013
Micromodels H1 pack artwork

Micromodels H1 pack artwork [image info]

Assembled streamlined Coronation Class locomotive from Micromodels Set MII

Assembled streamlined Coronation Class locomotive from Micromodels Set MII [image info]

Micromodels "Coronation Scot" (from sets MII and X), perspective view

Micromodels "Coronation Scot" (from sets MII and X), perspective view [image info]

Angled view

Angled view [image info]

A built card model of a streamlined blue Coronation-Class locomotive, from Micromodels Set MII ("M2", using Roman numerals).

The model seems to carry the running number "6244", which would correspond to the LMS "City of Leeds" / "King George VI", which was built streamlined, but wasn't blue. This may be why listings of the card model don't tend to bother mentioning the loco number.

This example of the model is rather well built, and is mounted on a small wooden plinth with track and a coach from Set X.

A note on the underside indicates that it was completed by its builder on 10/8/1953, and mounted on the base some years later.

Micromodels Set MII

Set MII contains cards to build two small streamlined locomotive models.

"Princess Coronation" Class / LMS Railway

A blue "Coronation-Class" 4-6-2 locomotive with stripes.

This is a difficult model to build realistically, due to the complex curvature of the nose. beginners may find that the front of the loco looks "slabby" on the final model: more advanced builders will "work" the back of the nose panels to create a bulging "dish"-shape (a little like the way that panel-beaters work sheet-metal) before assembling.

"West Country" Class / Southern Railway

A green "West Country" Class "air-smoothed" locomotive and tender, with thick yellow horizontal stripes.

These locomotives were unusual in having streamlined sides that extended forward to become smoke deflectors on either side of a conventional-looking recessed circular locomotive front. The front edge of the protruding smoke-deflector plates were angled, and stuck out further at the bottom then the top.

These locos tended to be associated with the Golden Arrow train.

See also

External links